Zagreb 7 – Maksimir Park

Maksimir Park is in the north east of the city, well served by trams 4, 7, 11 and 12 (same fare wherever you travel).  The park was full of people. There are wilder parts and very well frequented paths with street lighting as in Norway. I saw two cafes but only the Gazebo one was open. The Swiss House must be a summer only venue.

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The first lake I came to in Maksimir Park – blue sky reflected with Autumn colours.

Basically I was in heaven!

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Dusk and the lights from the stadium over the road.

People ran and cycled and wandered.

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The Pavillion of Echoes – mother and daughter whispering.

They played and kissed.

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The Pavillion of Echoes – typical feature of the early romantic garden based on the English model.
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A saltire flag of pansies.

Some seemed to be preparing for the camino with 2 walking poles a-piece and going at a fair speed.

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Birch Cottage built between 1853 and 1862. An old man, the only person to speak to me except a boy who said bok (hi) stopped and told me all about the architecture (I think) in fluent Croatian.

There are several open air theatre type spaces.

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Path and stream on the Police Academy side of Maksimir park.

Alzthough I smiled, almost everyone looked straight through me without changing their expressions – bioth here and in the city, although in the shops and museums they are friendly when I make an effort to say my first word – hvala, thank you.

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I saw a man climb these what I thought were sculptures. Maybe they are part of a fitness regime?

Lots of ancient oak trees, with beechm birch, chestnut and many others. It is the trees which are the spectacle here. The trees and the lakes.

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St Jurajs Chapel, named after Archbishop Juraj Haulik who designed and created the park.
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Misty Autumn seedheads.

There are ducks on all the lakes, and birds singing in the trees.

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More reminders of my Scottish home, in sky and reflection.
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Tiny toasdstools I found inside a rotting hollow of a fallen tree.
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More felled trees – the park is beautifully managed.
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The education centre I think. Looked like Hansel and Gretels place to me.
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Red catkins  and those ´sculptures´ opposite.
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There is a Dahlia Valley but I think the best must have been over as there were a desultory few in a couple of beds. Always remind me of my Poppa who gave me my first tubers when I was student in London.
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Grasses.
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Lighting straight out of The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe. They looked magical when they were all lit as I was leaving (but didn´t make good photos).
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The Gazebo. ´Typically Palladium motifs varied by the Viennna architecture.´ There is a cafe here.

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St Jeronimas Church near the entrance to the zoo which is also part of the Maksimir Park.
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The first statue of a woman I have seen (excepting the Virgin Mary).

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There is some more information and extra photos here on the Zagreb 4 blog.

Nature pleases – Picardy 4

End of October 2018

Wu Chi – undifferentiated timelessness, the un-manifest aspect of the Tao. In peacock feathers from the garden birds.

I enjoyed teaching an introduction to Chi Gung for a group of Masters students (Greek, Dutch, American) from the Netherlands before I left. Their performances at Thursday’s showcase were stimulating: a two-hander addressing non-binary issues in an appropriately naïve style, and a quirky performed reading reminding me of the toymaker in Copélia.

View from the garden. It was colder in the final days, but I still did T’ai Chi there in the morning sun.

Delicate ivy ‘drawings’ on the wall.

Silver birch bark – surely the origin of the design of camouflage clothing!

Autumn leaf burning by E. I sat and watched the burning embers and the small flames lick as the sky darkened. The fire was still warm in the morning.

The walk back to the station took me past Halloween house decorations, the luminous sumac tree, and a village hall (last time the gate was shut and I couldn’t see in, so this time I crept up and peered in the window – they were all playing cards in there!). Then there were two furry friendly (hungry?) donkeys who I was instructed not to feed, and several people who kindly stopped to offer me a lift, which I declined so I could walk.

Sumac tree.

The WW1 memorial for the dead soldiers, significant given that the topic of my studies is death.

German troops occupied these small villages between 19 14-18. Britain helped out. There are information boards all along the roads of this area of Picardy with photos of these times.

Strips of roots growing across the bottom of the tree.

A whorl of bark.

Flowers found at ground level on the pavement.

Outside the old school is this lovely sundial with the inscription La grive aux raisins (thrush with grapes is a delicacy and also the name of the local newsletter) and on the gate of the village room.

View from the train to Reims.

Another sundial, a giant one in Reims lit up in the night. Cadrans Solaire de la Marne, also connected to WW1 as the River Marne, site of the battles of 1914 and 1918 where the German advancements were halted.

From the back of a toilet door at Le Maryland bar in Reims – not so very respectful of our monarch!

This bar is near the Cathedral and I do not recommend it as it was full of smokers and smoke, and with men making not so-funny remarks. I didn’t feel comfortable there on my own.

Sculpture by Armelle Blary https://armelleblary.com in a window in Reims – inspired by the work of Louise Bouregeois I would guess.

Les bunnies. At the home of Julie Martin who was my bla bla car driver 10 days before and who kindly invited me to stay on my return. Together with her lovely flatmate, Marie, I was cooked two sorts of crêpes which were delicious.

Many thanks to them for their hopitality. Check out their innovate business: Be Vegetal My Friend which offers all sorts of workshops with plants and flowers, plus you can see Julie demonstrating what she does, and go there to get designs for your wedding or event.

Julie Martin, Be Vegetal My Freind, in her element!

Reims Tourist Information

Quiet moments – Picardy 3

Nearing the end of October, Northern France

Yesterday I lay down on my back to do my exercises under a tree with my eyes closed. I was focusing on my breath and muscles, moving through my paces. I opened them on hearing a tweet and there, in the spreading branches (don’t they always spread?) and bright leaves, was one, no, two, a whole flock of little birds with long tails bobbing up and down, jutting their tiny heads and flitting fast from place to place. I couldn’t see their backs because I was underneath, but there were hints of pink adding to the brown and beige. They took no notice of me, which was nice.

As I watched, a beastie with many legs crawled up the edge of my arm and onto the top; another one went in and, thankfully, out of my ear; an ant went all round my knee.

When I went to the loo I sprayed soft moss fronds and scratchy bits of autumn twig on the floor!

Later sitting at my desk, writing, the lime greenery was only broken by the odd brown leaf and matching beech nuts opening their hard lips to the air. From the first floor I am half way up where the branches are thinner. It all shivers and sways gently, not much, almost settling, continuing its dialogue with the breeze.

Shadows on my bedroom wall from that same tree outside, like an old sepia shot.

This morning I stood beside another one to do my T’ai Chi. Just as I got to move 134 I found myself back at thirty something so I completed almost a whole second round (140 in total). I got slower and slower. In the fog I saw the tips of my fingers, covered in fine rain, shift in my peripheral vision and I felt myself sink a little.

A bit sun bleached, this photo, but it shows the thin horizontals between branches. I’ve not noticed them before.

It’s trunk was very quiet, half in, half out of the ground. I couldn’t see it move although I knew it was, inside. It stood there before I got here of course, and stands there now. I tried to emulate it. I thought of the tree, being in all weathers; watching people, animals and insects coming and going over the years. The wind rustled it. Then did the same to my hair. I stood, learning.

Then I stood still, ‘standing like a tree’ (it’s a chi gung exercise). It was lighter now (approaching 7am). I enjoyed it.

First in shoulder stand and then bottom in the air – the world looked lovely even upside down looking between my legs.

After I gave Shiatsu to a wood worker this morning, I left him on the mat and walked to the window. High on the second floor I was level with the top of the tree and there was a woodpecker. No, really. Right there. Black and white all down its back with a red top knot and knickers. The window was closed, but I saw it noiselessly tapping inbetween tilting its head to the right as if looking to see if anyone was coming.

When I looked back into the room and asked how L was doing, he said “floating” and then there was a wait. From inside himself with his eyes tight shut he added, “my body’s fizzing”.

I didn’t try to take a photo of the woodpecker in case I disturbed it. However this little critter, a ladybird, was on my last piece of apple (from the tree in the garden) when I came back in.