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The iconic Edinburgh Castle standing on a volcanic plug, estimated to have formed some 350 million years ago.
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It was a prison in the late 18th century, and before that a fortress involved in the Jacobite Rising in 1745.

 

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On a good day you get a wonderful view from the Castle esplanade.
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Listen out for the bagpipes! Today he must have had very, very cold fingers.
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When you approach from Castle Terrace from the west you might already be in the Highlands. It dominates the city and attracts more visitors than any other monument in Scotland, but it is therefore very expensive to visit.
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Very close by are the bonny Ramsey Garden private apartments.
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The Camera Obscura is at the top of the Royal Mile (the round turret on the left of the skyline). The Palace of Holyrood is at the bottom.

The church-like building on the right of the skyline is now the Edinburgh Festival ‘Hub’. Built between 1842 and 1845, as the Victoria Hall, to house the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, the building was created by architects: James Gillespie Graham and Augustus Welby Pugin. Curiously the building was never consecrated as a Church. In 1929 the Church of Scotland ceased to use the building and it became a temporary home for a variety of congregations. It was named the Highland Tolbooth St John’s Church in 1956, before falling into disuse in the 1980s. (http://www.thehub-edinburgh.com/about-us/history/).

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A series of narrow ‘closes’ on the left as you leave the Edinburgh castle, take you down steep steps to The Mound with the tower of New College (The University of Edinburgh) on the left here.

The snow on the hills of Fife, over the Firth of Forth, was visible to the naked eye in the far distance.

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The Lloyds Banking Head Office and the Museum on the Mound, focusing on money, coinage and economics, where you can view a million £s.
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A statue of a piper in a kilt!

The impressive, neoclassical buildings of the National Galleries, built by William Henry Playfair in 1859 at the foot of the Mound.

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Simple interior. January sees the annual showing of the JMW Turner paintings collection. They are only able to be displayed at this time of year when the light is dim so that they do not deterioriate too quickly. A gift to the city – free entry for everyone.
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Crossing Princes Street with its clothes, books and phone shops, look both ways for Rose Street running parallel and sandwiched between that and George Street to the north. It boasts some impressive concrete poetry (English, Scots and Gaelic) and plenty of places to drink and buy whisky.
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Continue down the hill and you have left the Old Town (the Castle etc) and entered the elegant New Town with its 1767-1850 Georgian style.

Visit Scotland website: https://www.visitscotland.com

For Edinburgh Castle opening times etc: https://www.edinburghcastle.gov.uk/

Edinburgh Camera Obscura: https://www.camera-obscura.co.uk/

Edinburgh National Galleries: https://www.nationalgalleries.org/

2 thoughts on “Edinburgh – Athens of the North

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