Camden Market – Regents Canal Towpath – London Zoo

October 2018 – I had spent a month in Ireland and had just arrived in London to visit family and lead a Shiatsu workshop. Having stayed the night with my daughter, I woke to find that the sun was shining and I thought I would take my rucksack on a nice walk across London to Chiswick to meet my sister. Approx. 7 miles / 11.5 kms.

I started at Kentish Town West underground station, and turned tail  cutting through small streets as they took my fancy, avoiding the busy commuters rushing to work

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Public wash house, Grafton Road, London
MAP studio and café where I stopped for breakfast, good tea and music, Grafton Road, London
The roof space of MAP café, Grafton Road, London

Refreshed, I found the Owl Bookshop which was full of school children browsing. There was a lovely sense of excitement amongst them at the prospect of the reading.

The Owl Bookshop, Kentish Town Road, London

‘Natural’ is a mix of MAP and Owl, being a café with books stacked in the window!

Further along Kentish Town Road was Natural, London
Prince of Wales Road
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The Abbey Tavern, a typical London pub, Kentish Town Road, London
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Greek Orthodox Cathedral, Kentish Town Road, London (perhaps a hint of where I might end my Autumnal travels though I had no inkling I would be going to Northern Greece at that time )
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Creation Studios, Kentish Town Road, London

At the end of Kentish Town Road, I turned right into Hawley Road.

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Hawley Primary School, Hawley Road, London
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Slightly to the left, ahead, was Castlehaven Open Space, London

I took a left onto Castlehaven Road and left again onto Chalk Farm Road.

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And not very much further was one of my favourite teenage haunts  Camden Market, London

I wound my way between stalls and caravans selling food and other goodies.

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Here I found bookshop number 3, the Blackgull which is also a book binders, Camden Lock, London

On my left was the towpath…

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With weeping willows and colourful reflections in the still water, London
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Barges which you can take along to Little Venice for sightseeing, Regents Canal, London
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Here the canal is closely flanked by new residential units and I spied the tower of the Pirate Castle on the bridge.
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Under the Oval Road, looking ahead at the train running over the canal, London

Remember to check out Banksy’s famous artwork  in the vicinity (24 – 26 Oval Road).

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Paddle Boarding, London

You can stand up and paddle on a board under the full moon, at hallowe’en and combine it with prosecco!

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Going under Gloucester Avenue, London
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The conical spire of St Mark’s Church in the distance, Camden, London NW1 7TN

When I caught up with it (the church) I appreciated its six-petalled, flower windows.

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Sleeping rough away from the traffic
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A busy waterway, Regents Canal, London
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Highly decorated London Waterbus
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Monks enjoying the peace and quiet, London

There were bicycles and a wheel barrow on the roof of a house boat; paintings propped up against trees and hanging on sheets along the washing line; a bench with a proud goat who has curled horns (you will have to go and see!); there was graffiti galore.

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At the corner I turned right and admired the Feng Shang Princess restaurant boat, resplendant in its red livery

Not long afterwards I realised I was not far from Primrose Hill on the right and alongside the world famous London Zoo opposite where the previously mentioned Waterbus makes a drop-off, just before the pretty wrough-iron bridge.

At the Prince Albert Ramp I had the chance of a detour for Camden High Street, and ahead was St John’s Wood, the Snowdon Aviary and Lord’s Cricket Ground. I trundled along taking photos of the wild plants. Joggers jogged and I got to the Jubilee Greenway completed in 2012 to mark the Queen’s birthday and the London Games.

My path took me around Regents Park, named after the Prince Regent, where there’s an Open Air Theatre and a boating lake.

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Winfield House, the residence of the US Ambassador
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Under Park Road, London
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Creative garden spaces, Regents Canal, London

Here there were delphiniums (even though it was October) and foxgloves.

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Quintessentially English flowers in pots, Regents Canal, London
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A waterside village of longboats and cute dwellings, Regents Canal, London

At the Canal Gate (pictured at the top of this blog) I had to leave because the way was blocked off.

I carried on along pavements by busy roads, past underground stations and shops, discovering parts of London I had never visited before. I made my way to Chiswick via Holland Park Avenue, Shepherd’s Bush, the Goldhawk Road, Stamford Brook Road and Bath Road where I met my sister.

My phone ran out so I stopped taking photos and used my handy Belkin Pocket Power (a 5000 mAh portable charger which has been my saving grace many times) to recharge it.

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Hot with the action and the weight of the rucksack, I was glad to sit down and have a cup of tea. Had I ‘world enough and time’ I would have visited St Michael and All Angels Church in Turnham Green, an Arts and Crafts building which a gentleman told me about as I stood waiting to cross a road. We had a most pleasant chat while he also regaled me with his life in India. I meet the most interesting characters when I walk.

The Regents Park and Primrose Hill both have excellent views of the London skyline. Royal Parks website.

Had we but world enough and time,
This coyness, lady, were no crime.
We would sit down, and think which way
To walk, and pass our long love’s day.
The opening lines of ‘To His Coy Mistress’ by Andrew Marvell

 

The garden of the Geffrye Museum of the Home – London, England

A photo essay – July blooms

I just can’t seem to stop taking pictures of flowers! I have added links to a blog I have just discovered (London wlogger – we seem to like the same things) and other London gardens which will be sure to delight.

The garden is round the back and I visited when the rest of the museum was being renovated.

It is now open. Website.

Don’t miss this blog which has great shots of the front of the building and much more. Londonwlogger.com

Other physic gardens include Chelsea which had contemporary art too.

And of course Kew.

You might not know about this community garden hidden behind St Pancreas. Camley Street.

The Kyoto Garden has reopened.

Echinacea

The Hill Garden and Pergola Hampstead

London Plantology. She’s also into aikido so must be good!

Is your favourite here? If not, please do comment with one I don’t know about or link to your own London garden.

London Photo Essay

I was born in England but have lived in Edinburgh, Scotland for many years. Take a tour with me around some of the best known London sights. Discover parts of the UK capital that you might not know; and enjoy the architecture, the views and the detail of this fabulous city. It is my personal selection.

Trafalgar Square, Nelson's Column
Trafalgar Square, Nelson’s Column
Trafalgar Square with the fountains
Trafalgar Square with the fountains, London, England.
The Ritz hotal and a red London bus in the same shot.
The Ritz hotel and a red London bus in the same shot.

The Ritz, featured in the wonderful 1999 film Notting Hill.

The Connaught Hotel - only for the rich
The Connaught Hotel – only for the rich.
BT (formerly Post Office) Tower
BT (formerly Post Office) Tower, London.
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Typical London Pubs – purveyors of fine ale – Chiswick.
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The North Star, Ealing.
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Kew Garden Station pub, Tap on the Line.
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Kew Gardens, London.
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The amazing Marianne North Gallery,  Kew Gardens, London.
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Detail, Kew Gardens, London.

Do you like green spaces? Would you like to see more of London’s lush hidden corners?

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St Pancreas Parish Church and graveyard, London.

My blog link: Camley Street Natural Park, St Pancreas Parish Church and graveyard, and Goldington Crescent, Camden.

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Hammersmith Bridge, London, England.
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The iconic Tower Bridge, London, England.
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The Shard, near London Bridge.
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The Houses of Parliament and Big Ben (clock tower) from the train rolling over Hungerford Bridge.

 

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The O2 arena, London, England.
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The Emirates Airline gondolas / cable cars across the Thames, London.
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Atmospheric views from the Tate Modern Art Gallery: River Thames and St Paul’s Cathedral.
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Again, from the Tate: The Shard and East London skyscrapers.
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Through the new Tate Modern windows.
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The new Tate Modern and views outside.
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Barbara Hepworth’s Winged Figure on the side of the John Leiws Building, Oxford Street, London.
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Take a peaceful walk along the River Thames – Hammersmith to Chiswick for example.
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Mosque, Gunnersbury, London.
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The Geffrye Museum of the House currently closed for rennovation but the front garden is still open for picnics and games, London. Near Hoxton Tube.
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and gardens
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and more gardens.
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The newly rennovated Pitzhanger Manor, Ealing. Opening July 2018.
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The elegant St Pancreas Station – outside.
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and inside. (St Pancreas Station, London).
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The Ladies Toilets at Fenchurch Street Station, London. Using the Monopoly game as inspiration.
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Walk between Chiswick and Ealing in south east London via Gunnersbury Parkl and you will come across church. Tell me if you know the name as I have researched it and cannot find it out!
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Its graveyard.
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and contemplative garden.
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Hyde Park in winter. London.
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The Serpentine, Hyde Park, London.
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Spring daffodils – a classic feature of London’s parks – with the warm, red sandstone houses beside Hyde Park. 
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Selfridges, Oxford Street, London.
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John Nash’s Regency sweep of Oxford Street, City of Westminster, London.
Britannia out front
Institute of Directors building, Pall Mall, London.
The Union Jack flying
The Union Jack flying near the Royal Opera Arcade, Pall Mall, London.
St James Palace
St James Palace, London.
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The British Museum, Euston Road, London.
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Tile detail – typical of south east London residential accommodation.
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The Passmore Edwards Cottage Hospital, Acton, London.
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Sunset on the River Thams from Hammersmith Bridge, London.

Check out this lovely blog which is also about hidden gardens and churches of London.

and this one too. Some of London’s best secret gardens.

London and Paris – Green spaces

Camley Street Natural Park; St Pancreas Parish church and gardens; and Goldington Crescent Gardens, Camden London.

The entrance to Pitzhanger Manor (being restored – it opens in 2018) and park, Ealing, London.

As I wander through European cities I find myself attracted time and again to the green spaces. Indeed a few days ago, at the advice of my walking guru, I traversed most of Paris from the Bois (woods) de Boulogne in the far east, to the Pont (bridge) Bercy.  I did not manage all the way the the Bois de Vincennes in the west due to time constraints.

Bois de Boulogne
Bois de Boulogne
Bois de Boulogne
Pont Bercy, Paris

Today I arrived off the Eurostar at St Pancreas London, weary in body and of spirit but the sun shone so I googled parks and gardens in the area. I made my way to the St Pancreas gardens, narrowly avoiding being run over by a London taxi due to the lack of a pavement, and came across a community garden I had tried to enter twice before, Camley Street Natural Park – this time it was open.

A slice of sylvan pleasure between railway, canal, and high rise buildings, I discovered that this London Wildlife Trust funded oasis is an ideal place to picnic. Flower beds are constructed from railway sleepers and hunks of stone with bordered pathways lined with bark pieces.

There is an extensive pond with a green membrane pierced by rushes, and a wild flower meadow with rose bay willow herb. It constitutes a very brief, windy way to the other side if you use it, as many suit-clad workers obviously do, as a thoroughfare; but you may also make a circuit and take in the bug-finding, log-pile place; the ‘fairy glade’ (where if I was not mistaken a counselling session was happening); and pond-dipping where a quiet volunteer was carefully cleaning the sign.

There are rustic benches in private nooks, and luckily a few tables in the cafe clearing because it was so densely wooded that there was almost no sun this September noon.

Bring your little ones and they will have hours of down-to-earth fun – inside if the weather is inclement (there is an activities room and exhibition with nests and pine cones) or out, learning about bats and birds, recycling and natural landscaping. I saw willow, birch, brambles and cherry, and there were tourists in the Visitor Centre being helped by the member of staff.

This old coal yard is located by the waterway which once transported the fuel to Yorkshire, where incidentally the next-door sliver of a bridge was formed before being placed in its current position in 2016. Unlike the Park’s paths which absorb any sound (do not try with buggies, bikes nor suitcases), the bridge’s smooth surface resonates with and amplifies joggers’ footfall and cycle wheels.

Just down the road is the St Pancreas old church and gardens, today shining in the sun and showing off its higgledy-piggleddy stones, working mortuary, royal blue water fountain (at least I think that is what it is), and unusual monument “especially dedicated to the memory of those whose graves are now unseen or the records of whose names may be …(could not read this word) obliterated”.

They have done a great job of bringing interesting facts and people to our attention in the wee church: the relationship of Thomas Hardy to the ‘consecrated burial ground’, and memorials to Mary Wollenstonecraft, female activist, and John Soane, architect of the Bank of England whose main residence is in the area and whose ‘country’ house in Ealing (Pitzhanger Manor, see above) I coincidentally visited last week.

Under the trees sit study groups, lunching pairs and individuals reading or on their phones. What a contrast with the welcome smell of warm wax which filled the holy interior. I enjoyed the plaque ‘in memory of my dear husband Earnest Wiggins d 1975’ before drifting into my third bout of 60 winks sitting on a proud wooden chair at the back listening to the ponderous ticking of an unseen clock.

Making my way towards Mornington Crescent tube station, with its faint hints of Mary Poppins and WW2 popular songs, I come across Goldington Crescent Gardens. In the Autumn sun, causing the fallen leaves to glow and throwing strong olive green and top-hat grey shadows on the grass, there is a public sculpture. It is in three parts: one resembles a silver pile of unmentionable; the second an ant eater with its snout in the ground; and the third I know not what. It stands out starkly beside the pink and red brick 1903 Goldington Buildings opposite, its edges elegantly wrapping around whatever is in its heart. Interesting fact: in Vienna they have a word for these buildings which conceal a space behind the facade which is ‘Hof’.

Goldington Crescent, London.
St Vincenz Hof, 18th, Vienna, Austria
Behind St Pancreas station, London.
Love, Jardin du Luxembourg, Paris.
Beehives, Jardin du Luxembourg, Paris.