Winter Solstice walk

In response to Elspeth Penfold and Blake Morris #52more no.16


Choose a book, follow the score and see where your walk takes you.

Here is the link to the blog which explains Elspeth’s thinking behind her and Blake’s walking score.

Map of the Forbidden City taken from Elspeth Penfold’s blog

In response to the Map of the Forbidden City with its Gate of Divine Prowess and Hall of Imperial Peace, I will use Tsubook (it’s a Shiatsu app) and specifically the Lung meridian map.

Each acupressure point which is located along the channel has a name translated from the Chinese. It starts at Central Palace in the chest, passes through the Cloud Gate, Celestial Storehouse, Cubit Marsh, Collection Hole, Broken Sequence, Channel Ditch, Great Abyss, and Fish Border. I have chosen 9 of the 11 points (the points where I use my thumb or an acupuncturist would use a needle), because those relate to place and tell the story of a journey.

Illustration from Shiatsu by Carola Beresford-Cooke


Here are @ElspethPenfold prompts, rearranged and collaged from @BlakeMorris score:

  • A collective endeavour,
  • Do away with the outside,
  • Consider the relationship,
  • Function as a storytelling mechanism,
  • If walking is akin to a speech act, then it can also craft stories of space
The walking score devised by Elspeth Penfold and Blake Morris

@ThreadandWord #52more @blakewalks thisisnotaslog.com link to A Different Lens, award winning project by Elspeth Penfold and Thread and Word, which I made a small contribution to. This is my walk #16

Walking Paris with score #17

4 December 2021

The prompt came from Mathilda and Blake as part of the on-going series 52More. Mathilda walked in Paris and Blake in New York, connecting up in time and through the score – a faded green British Library card with random phrases pasted on it.

Before leaving London I visited the British Library. I forgot my card, though I had my Edinburgh City and National Library of Scotland cards on me.

Library cards, but not the right one

I bought 3 presents, one for each of my hostesses in France’s capital city, put each in a scarlet paper bag with BL on them, and promptly left them all at St Pancras in my rush to board the Eurostar.

My moment of immediate excitement – the French flag flying above the Gare du Nord

I am here to teach Shiatsu, a form of Japanese / South East Asian bodywork. Shi means fingers, atsu, pressure. These hands spoke to me amongst the industrial units on my walk through Barbes.

Hands on the wall

On Linda’s table, were feathers in all shapes and sizes, not identical to the ones I have been collecting on my walks since the start of lockdown 1.

Feathers courtesy of Linda

I walked on the Petite Ceinture with my friend, Alain. It’s an ex-railway, now used by walkers.

La Petite Ceinture

It’s not exactly the subway, but it passes below street level and tunnels are dotted along it, not unlike my Trinity Tunnel on the Edinburgh cycle path.

Shiatsu practitioner and teacher, Alain Tauch

At the Musée Cernuschi, I found more Cranes (I was with them at the National Museum of Scotland a few days ago), symbols of longevity and immortality because they were believed to live for 1000 years. Their feathers were SMALL BITS of beautiful sculpture from the Japanese Edo Period, 1603-1868.

Crane incense holder, feather detail

I enjoyed the smile on the face of the qin zither player, an entertainer from the Han period (25-220).

This is the lid (in the form of a mountain) of a funerary object.

Sitting on the highest point, closest to heaven, he has transformed metaphysically, as depicted by his extended head, signalling that the energy of his crown chakra is so developed that he has achieved something akin to enlightenment.

Blake Morris @formerfresnan (twitter) @blakewalks (Insta)

Mathilda @thetravelingtype_ and https://www.wildlyidle.com/